Mozart: Symphony no. 35 – movement 1 of 4 – part 3


Disagreement

A funny thing that happens on bars 24-26 is disagreement! I don’t know where it stems from but my Dover edition of this symphony says that the bassoons play the same as the cellos, while my Eulenburg edition says what is written here. Orchestras play both!

What can you learn from this? A great deal!

  1. Always double-check your sources (This applies not only to orchestration or music)
  2. Check different recordings and listen to how the two versions make two very different situations.

In this edition you’ll notice that the unison bassoon parts carry a light shadow of the heavy 3 octave string line (both written in a forward motion style) which makes great sense since Mozart then divides the bare into a very natural heavy half note and a lighter half note.

Start on 37 seconds

First half is not only rhythmically supported by the trumpets but also the timpani, which stop on 3 making the last half bar even lighter.

The Dover edition will make a greater difference, since the last half bar will be quite exposed for the 1st violins.

Start on 38 seconds

Dover will have a rhythmically denser bottom of bar 26, while Eulenburg will have a tenor line in the bassoons rhythmically punctuated by the lower strings.

All these things to look out for when listening to performances!

Until next time, try to do a condensation of high woodwinds, horn and 2nd violins, to see how this pad of chords support the rest of the orchestra and how they rhythmically build up to 27!

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3 Responses to Mozart: Symphony no. 35 – movement 1 of 4 – part 3

  1. Pingback: Mozart: Symphony no. 35 – movement 1 of 4 – part 2 | scoresome

  2. Pingback: Mozart: Symphony no. 35 – movement 1 of 4 – part 1 | scoresome

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